A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [CLOSE]

For Parents: Asthma Facts

 
This page has been automatically translated from English. MSDH has not reviewed this translation and is not responsible for any inaccuracies.

Talk to your child's doctor about asthma symptoms, asthma triggers, and asthma medicines.

See your child's doctor regularly, especially if you notice any changes in your child's asthma symptoms. Be prepared — know about asthma and questions to ask.

Action Plan

Follow an Asthma Action Plan

  • First, work with your child's doctor to develop an Asthma Action Plan for your child. Every child's asthma is different, so it is important to have an individual plan.

  • Give a copy of your child's Asthma Action Plan to school nurses, teachers, childcare providers, coaches and other caregivers. Talk with them about your child's asthma symptoms, triggers, and medications.

Asthma Triggers

Control Asthma Triggers

  • At home

    For resources to help you identify and remove asthma triggers in your home, see our Indoor Triggers page.

  • At school

    Talk to your child's teacher and school nurse about asthma triggers at school. Common triggers found in the school setting include dust, pests such as cockroaches, air fresheners, cleaning supplies, furry animals, and exhaust from cars and school buses.

    To help your child's teacher understand how the school environment can trigger your child's asthma, give them the checklist 10 Ways to Manage Asthma in the School Environment.

    Encourage your school to adopt an anti-idling policy. This policy will limit children's exposure to exhaust from cars and school buses. For more information about anti-idling policies adopted by other schools, see EPA's Clean School Bus Program.

    Encourage your school principal or your School Health Council to use the Environmental Protection Agency's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools kit. This kit helps schools find and fix indoor air quality problems that can trigger asthma.

  • At childcare

    Asthma triggers can also be found in the childcare setting. To help your childcare provider identify and remove asthma triggers common in the childcare setting, give them the How Asthma-Friendly is Your Childcare Setting? checklist.

    The Asthma Coalition of Mississippi has developed an asthma training for childcare providers. If your childcare provider would like more information or to schedule a training at their facility, please contact Jasmine Williams, Asthma Coalition of Mississippi Coordinator, at jwilliams@breathehealthy.org or phone 601-206-5810.

For more about asthma and asthma resources, see our Asthma Program pages.

Our free newsletter includes monthly disease updates: 
Last reviewed on Nov 3, 2016
Mississippi State Department of Health 570 East Woodrow Wilson Dr Jackson, MS 39216 866-HLTHY4U web@HealthyMS.com
Facebook Twitter Instagram RSS